30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
"Arrow" Executive Producer Marc Guggenheim explains why this season's big bad is "a different kind of foe."
30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Much of the initial buzz — and promotional material — surrounding “American Horror Story: Freak Show” revolved around John Carroll Lynch’s nightmare clown Twisty, so imagine the public’s surprise when the character was murdered in the series’ fourth episode, brutally stabbed then whisked away to spend an eternity wandering with Edward Mordrake’s band of misfit... Read more »
30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
These weird expressions are basically the opposite of an Instagram filter.
30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
David Broom of "Real World: New Orelans" has begun making YouTube videos as a sexy chef.
30 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Spinefarm Records, the hard rock label owned by the Universal Music Group, and Search and Destroy Records, via Raw Power Management, have created a...
30 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Recent Billboard cover star Chris Brown is a couple steps closer to getting out of legal trouble. According to TMZ, the singer recently settled a...
30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Colleges everywhere are supporting Emma Sulkowicz's action against rape by doing as she does and carrying mattresses around their schools.
30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Rihanna wore one of Tom Ford's latest designs to the amfAR Inspiration Gala.
30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Yo, Millertary: Listen to Jake Miller's debut EP, 'Lion Heart,' before its official November 4 release exclusively on MTV!
30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Media critic Anita Sarkeesian appeared on the "Colbert Report," and it was fantastic.
30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Kendrick Lamar has a new song called 'King Kunta' that Pharrell really loves.
30 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Here's your daily dose of feelings: At a concert in Manchester's Albert Hall Wednesday night, Sam Smith brought Ed Sheeran up on stage with him to...
30 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Are you currently going through life totally unaware of the fact that, in 2005, Rihanna was an up-and-comer who was chosen, along with Amerie and...
30 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Taylor Swift is currently in the middle of jam-packed press tour, but she's already excited about getting out to arenas for a 1989 tour. The singer...
30 October, 2014 - RollingStone.com
Dave Sitek has produced everyone from the Yeah Yeah Yeahs to Beady Eye, but his best work has come with Tunde Adebimpe, Kyp Malone and Jaleel Bunton: the other members of TV on the Radio (bassist Gerard Smith died in 2011). The 42-year-old Sitek produces the band in his home studio, plays guitar and keyboards, makes killer loops and rocks a Run-D.M.C. T-shirt onstage. We caught up with him recently to discuss Seeds, the band's fifth studio album (scheduled for November 18th). But first, we talked about the culinary arts: the gourmand Sitek is the reason Kelis's 2014 album Food (which he produced) is full of song titles like "Jerk Ribs," "Cobbler" and "Friday Fish Fry." Fall Music Preview 2014: 25 Must-Hear Albums You're a foodie guy – the last time I saw you, four years ago, you were talking about starting a pop-up chicken restaurant. Did that ever happen?It did not, because I pretty much have not stopped working since I saw you last. We do throw barbecues here a lot, though, just different writers and studio musicians I work with, trying out recipes. You never had lamb here, did you? That's the fucking showstopper. And Cat, who goes under the stage name Kitty Harlow, makes this banging strawberry salad that's just stupid.What else were you guys eating while you made Seeds?We were all over the map, but a lot of vegetables, a lot of fish. A lot of snacking was going on: Olives are the best of both worlds. You get salty, and it fills you up. Castelvetrano olives, the light green ones, are like little food diamonds. I can't imagine they're bad for you. Or I guess, who cares if they are?Did you have specific goals with this record?Not necessarily. We try to avoid making the same record twice, so I think it was more anti-goals. We just didn't want to repeat ourselves. It's subtle – we didn't write a country record or anything like that. I think that this one is more uptempo than Nine Types of Light, but I can't pinpoint the aesthetic things.How long did the album take?It was an on-and-off process, but about six months. We had the first wave of songs, then we went back to the drawing board and had a second wave of songs, and a third wave. When we were working on the third wave, we were also opening up the first wave and updating them. The writing happened in different stages, but most of the recording was done later on.TV on the Radio released "Mercy" and "Million Miles" last year. Were they originally meant to be on Seeds?No, those were just songs that we wrote because we hadn't written songs together in a while. They came out really fast and inspired us to do it again – and then "again" turned into the record.How did "Happy Idiot" come together?I was in El Paso, at the Sonic Ranch, where I did the Yeah Yeah Yeahs record. I was there by myself doing a bunch of writing. I made the instrumental, and I sent it to [Swedish pop star] Erik Hassle and Daniel Ledinsky and then they wrote the top line in an hour. And then Tunde was over at my house and he was like, "This song is fucking nuts, what needs to be done?" Daniel said, "You should just sing on it." So they cut it – Tunde did his vocals and killed it in an hour. Then the band heard it, jumped in and played their parts. It snuck its way onto the record: It wasn't even intended to be a TV on the Radio song, but it was probably the fastest of the tracks to come together.How do you guys put songs together? Are people bringing in songs or are you hammering them together in the studio?It's every possible way. We all come in with ideas and starts of songs, but most of the time we get a feel for where each other is writing and then we write in that direction. I can't think of any instances where we're like, "This is definitely a song." It's more that we play each other a bunch of stuff, and then we start making a racket, and that stuff turns into songs. "Seeds" was me and Tunde fucking around. "Careful You," Jaleel started making this crazy beat. Then me and Tunde edited it, and it became the song that it is.What song changed the most during the sessions?It's hard to say: A lot of these songs go through radical transformations. We think it's one way, and we live with it for a couple of weeks, and then one of us has an inkling to fuck it up and see if it still holds true. With this band, we try to make songs that could work in any style, so one way of figuring that out is to build a song and then take everything out and see if the song still sounds like a song. And if it does, try something at half tempo or twice the tempo and see if it still sticks. Given that style of working, how do you know when the record's done?We argue. Everyone in this band is extremely talented and aesthetically concerned. It's really about the feel of things, and sometimes those feels don't match up, and so we argue about it. It's super-rare that we unanimously agree, so we've learned how this argument process works. There's a lot of trust between us. If someone feels really strongly about something, we let him take the lead. No one in the band is in charge.What's your work schedule?All over the map, but I'm usually there 18 hours a day. If Kip was working early in the day, Tunde will work late at night, and Jaleel just sticks around with me most of the time. I'm always in the studio, and I'm always working. Whenever people feel like it, they can show up and I'll probably be recording. In New York, I was sleeping maybe three hours a night. Now I'm up to four or five, living the good life.Are you still in the same house in the Hollywood hills with the tiny home studio?I held onto that place as long as I possibly could, but it was unrealistic for the amount of work that I do. It got to the point where setting up a drum set in a bathroom was ridiculous. Three years ago, I moved to another place that's bigger. We actually have a proper drum room and a proper vocal booth. How is your studio decorated?Kelis gave me a four-foot Stevie Wonder velvet painting that pretty much occupies most of the space. And then Stephonik from Living Days, realizing how cool it looked, got me a velvet painting of Snoopy taking off on a rocket. Then another friend saw those two and got me a Bruce Lee velvet painting. For my birthday, another velvet painting: a Pegasus. And you know that YouTube video "It's So Cold in the D"? I was obsessed with that video, how the timing slips and it's recorded on this early VHS-quality thing. If you look at art as accurately reflecting the times, I feel like that's one of the greater pieces of art out there. So last year, Lovefoxxx from CSS did an oil painting of a still from that video and that's up there too. And a fuck-ton of pyramids and crystals and oversized polished stone skulls.When the band took time off, were you confident you would be getting back together or was it up in the air?Earth is up in the air, so I guess in that sense it was up in the air. Related TVOTR's Tunde Adebimpe on Leaving Brooklyn Behind Kelis Eats Ribs, Talks 'Food' Album Review: TV on the Radio, 'Dear Science'
30 October, 2014 - RollingStone.com
Twenty-fourteen, it seems, is the year of the Basement Tapes. Recorded in 1967 and first reported in a 1968 Rolling Stone cover story, the legendary collaborations between Bob Dylan and the Band were partially released in 1975 and have been bootlegged for nearly 50 years. 20 Overlooked Bob Dylan Classics Now, the full 138-track collection is coming out on November 4th. One week later, Lost on the River: The New Basement Tapes, follows close behind, featuring a supergroup of musicians tackling lost Dylan lyrics; and on November 21st at 9 p.m., Showtime is exploring the new tapes' project with a documentary titled Lost Songs: The Basement Tapes Continued. Watch Elvis Costello, Marcus Mumford, Jim James and the rest of this new (lowercase) band take on "Six Months in Kansas City (Liberty Street)," one of the final tracks to appear on the album, right here. With a trio including Carolina Chocolate Drops singer Rhiannon Giddens nailing the back-up vocals and almost outshining the rest of the unit, Costello and company roll through the track, building to stunning close that finds them repeating the title again and again. T Bone Burnett sits behind the mixing board, nodding and smiling. "T Bone called me and told me that he had these unpublished Dylan lyrics from the time of the Basement Tapes," Costello says elsewhere in the documentary, explaining the genesis of the project. "I said, 'Well what are they like?'" Later, Lost Songs features an original interview with Dylan himself, in which the songwriter helps provide an answer to that question. Related Rolling Stone's 1968 Cover Story: Dylan's Basement Tape Should Be Released How the Newport Folk Fest Got Its Groove Back Bob Dylan Sings 'I Shall Be Released' With Elvis Costello
30 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
The Fall Out Boy dudes have been making some new friends recently. First was Rick Ross, cameoing in the video for "Centuries," the band's first new...
30 October, 2014 - Billboard.com
Happy Birthday, Matthew Morrison! The Glee choir teacher to us all/solo recording artist turns 36 today, which is the perfect opportunity to re-watch...
30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Lauren Conrad and Kim Kardashian have the same Halloween costume in common.
30 October, 2014 - RollingStone.com
Kiesza's "Hideaway" began life as a viral dance video when it was uploaded in February. By summer, it had transitioned onto the pop charts and into the clubs, shedding the clip and becoming a Top 10 hit on the dance charts on both sides of the Atlantic. A self-proclaimed "thrill-seeker," the 25-year-old Canadian singing the song and dancing in the video (with a fractured rib, no less) entered music as a ballerina, but after stints in boot camp and a Jackson 5 cover band, she finally made it as a pop star. Last week, she released her first major studio album, Sound of a Woman, and explained to RS the complicated, unusual path that brought her to this point. Fall Music Preview 2014: 25 Must-Hear Albums Did you always grow up with music in your life? Yeah, I had a very musical household. I was more focused on ballet, actually. I trained until the age of three until 15, and then I had the classic "got an injury and had to give it up." I was also a theater kid. I was in The Nanny: The Musical, I was in Little Shop of Horrors. But then I had my mom, who was Ms. Diva-Worshipper. She loved all the divas and Michael Jackson. She controlled the music in our house. She made a Jackson 5 cover band with myself and my two brothers. So we learned all the Jackson 5 songs, and we put on costumes and sang along. It was just in our living room, but Pearl Jam was interested in having us open for them once. My mom was actually like, "Uh, they've never actually done this live." Wait, how did Pearl Jam find out about you? I think my mom was just interested to see if this little household band would have any interest outside, so I think she just asked. I'd have to ask her, but I think just a Jackson 5 cover band with three little kids is really appealing. The thing is when you have kids performing in your living room, you don't know how they are going to perform in front of a stadium of people. I don't think she want to risk us freezing onstage. What divas was your mom into? I had a lot of Aretha Franklin, Diana Krall... Why did I say Diana Krall? We actually did have Diana Krall, but that's totally separate. That was not a diva. We had Aretha Franklin, Etta James, we had Robin S., classic house records like Haddaway and Crystal Waters. And then I fell in love with Aaliyah, so I was into R&B. My brother was into hip-hop, so through his hip-hop influences, I got into R&B: Aaliyah, Destiny's Child, Salt-N-Pepa, TLC, Sade, Erykah Badu. And at some point here you decided to join the Navy? The Navy actually happened simultaneously. I started the tall-ships when I was 16, and I joined the Navy when I was 17. I was in the reserves. I wasn't signed on a contract, because I was still in high school. I was like a part-time naval person, so I had to go through all the training and everything. I would do part-time in the Navy every week, but in the summer I would do the tall-ships. I loved boot camp. They would test us to see how we went over these obstacles, and I'd go climb up this shaky rope over a puddle of water and then go back and do it again. I was showing off. I was like this 17-year-old diva like, "Look I could do it three times over" [laughs]. I ended up winning "Top Shot" award, so I found out I was a good shooter. Somehow the buzz got around, and they called me "Sniper" after that. Then someone from the army approached me and said, "Hey, I work with somebody who trains snipers. There has never been a female sniper, but would you be open to training with him." But I said no. Were you in different bands before you became a solo artist? I was in a rock band; I was my own folk singer; I was in a death metal band for a very short time; I was in a cover band, a jazz band, a blues band. I was in a gospel choir. But they were all side projects. When I started writing commercially, I went to New York and met Rami [Samir Afuni], who did "Hideaway" with me. He got me into the commercial pop writing world, which is ultimately where I was aiming. And I was like, "Oh, I'll just write pop music. It's just a side project to develop my writing." I just wanted to be able to go into a room with any kind of artist. And, "pop" just means popular. Like, whatever is popular at the time, and even if it's an Irish drinking tune that's popular. I wanted to learn how to write popular music, just really simple, catchy melodies. So how did "Hideaway" come about? It was the quickest song I'd ever written. I was actually thinking about moving to L.A., so I had a flight booked that day. I was working in the studio with Rami, and then I was going to go to the airport and catch a flight to L.A. I was leaving, we had finished whatever we were doing and he just started playing around with synths and came around with the "Hideaway" intro. I was just about to leave, and the "Hideaway" melody popped into my head, and I said, "Oh, I like that. Let me just lay it down quickly." He finished it half an hour after that, did a rough mix and master and sent it to me. By the time I got to the airport it was finished, and then I was running so quickly that I only managed to listen to it when I got to L.A. But essentially the song was written, recorded, mixed and mastered in 90 minutes. We never changed anything after that. We didn't give it to anybody to mix or anything. It's the demo that ended up coming out. After the success of "Hideaway," did a lot of artists hit you up to feature on their songs? Actually, at first I said no a lot. I was coming in with not necessarily a new sound, but it's new again. It's coming back. I was trying to stay with the deep house music, and it's a little slower than the EDM, so you have to get people used to the sound. I felt like a lot of the people who were hitting me up were solid, straight-up EDM artists with great music and great songs, but I wanted to really establish who I was as an artist, and I wanted to be successful on my own. I didn't want to be that artist that is successful as a result of someone else. Not that that's wrong, but I felt like I had what it took. I really believed I could do it on my own, so I wanted to try at least. You co-wrote "Go All Night" for the new Gorgon City album. How did you guys get Jennifer Hudson on that track? Actually, they were trying to get my "Hideaway" for her because she was going for a Chicago house sound. I was a sort of established writer now, and they were like, "Uh, please, can we have this song?" And I was like, "Sorry, I'm going to bet on myself this time." Related Behind Kiesza's 'Letterman' Dance Routine How Meghan Trainor Became 2014's Most Unlikely Pop Star How Tove Lo Became Sweden's Darkest Pop Export
30 October, 2014 - MTV.com
Nas previews a new song called 'The Session' produced by J. Dilla.
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